Fire Science Courses: Bachelor's in Fire Science



The Bachelor in Fire Science degree completion program consists of six core courses, ten fire science courses and four electives, for a total of 60 credit hours. The curriculum reflects the most current trends and research in the area of fire and emergency services.

At AMC our students are treated as individuals and as such we understand that your work experience, previous academic history and specific fire training is unique and should be evaluated in a case by case basis. A minimum of 60 credits is required to start this program.

These 60 credits can come from an associate’s degree* from a related field or from prior course work among other scenarios. Give us a call to learn more about our admission process and to talk to one of our representatives about a personalized evaluation of your resume and admissions needs.  877-265-3201.

15 additional transfer credits may be granted to students with one or more of the following:

  • State or national EMT.
  • FFI/II ProBoard/IFSAC Certified.
  • Acceptable credits from a regionally accredited four year institution.


For students with a fire related bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution a total of 90 credits may be granted.

*Associate’s degree must be from an regionally accredited institution.

 

AMC Core 18 credits
Course Name Credits
Writing for Career & Creativity 3 credits
US in the World 3 credits
Global Dynamics 3 credits
Quantitative Reasoning 3 credits
Justice (COR 304 Catholic Social Teaching) *Required 3 credits
Senior Seminar 3 credits

 

*With the exception of the Justice course, transfer credit may be awarded for the (above) core courses if you have already taken a course that falls into the appropriate subject area. This transfer credit will be included in the maximum 75 credits you can receive towards the program.

 

Required Fire Science Courses 30 credits
Course Number Course Name Credits
FRS 302 Emergency Services Management 3
FRS 307 Applications for Emergency Services Research 3
FRS 317 Political and Legal Foundations of Emergency Services 3
FRS 326 Human Resource Management for Emergency Services 3
FRS 351 Disaster Planning and Control 3
FRS 365 Fire Related Human Behavior 3
FRS 425 Emergency Services Budgeting and Finance 3
FRS 426 Community Engagement and Involvement 3
FRS 436 Critical Incident Stress Management for Emergency Services 3
FRS 465 Community Risk Reduction for Emergency Services 3

 

Fire Science Course Descriptions

FRS 302 Emergency Services Management
This course is designed to be a progressive primer for students who want more knowledge about fire and emergency services management. The course demonstrates the importance of the following skills necessary to effectively manage in an emergency services organization through the changes and challenges of the 21st century: persuasion and influence, accountable budgeting, anticipation of challenges and the need for change, and using specific management tools for analyzing and solving problems. A central part of the course focuses on how the leadership of a fire and emergency services department develops internal and external cooperation to create a coordinated approach to achieving the department's mission.

FRS 307 Applications for Emergency Services Research
This course examines the basic principles of research and methodology for analyzing current emergency services research. The course also provides a framework for conducting and evaluating independent research utilizing a variety of basic research methods.

FRS 317 Political and Legal Foundations of Emergency Services
This course introduces the Federal, State, and Local laws that regulate emergency services, national standards influencing emergency services, standard of care, tort, liability, and a review of relevant court cases.

FRS 326 Human Resource Management for Emergency Services
This course is designed to be a progressive primer for students who want more knowledge about human resources management as it pertains to emergency services. The course demonstrates the importance of skills necessary to manage human resources in an emergency services organization.

FRS 351 Disaster Planning and Control
This course examines concepts and principles of community risk assessment, planning, and response to fires and natural and man-made disasters, including civil disturbances, terrorists/threats, incidents, hazardous materials incidents, mass casualty events and earthquakes. Standard strategies and organizational frameworks are reviewed, including NIMS/ICS, mutual aid and automatic response, training and preparedness, communications and disaster mitigation and recovery.

FRS 365 Fire Related Human Behavior
The goal of this course is to provide students with knowledge of what we know about how humans respond to fire and how that knowledge has been integrated into life safety systems design and development. Students will examine current and past research on human behavior, systems models, life safety education and building design to determine interactions of these areas in emergency situations. Students will develop an understanding of best practice building life safety systems as one that combines knowledge in the areas of psychology and sociology joined with engineering and education to produce the best possible outcomes in terms of human survivability in the event of an emergency.

FRS 425 Emergency Services Budgeting and Finance
This course is designed to provide an overview of the budgeting and financing process for emergency services organizations. The course will discuss basics of types of budgets, budget construction, and budget prioritization. The overarching goal is to give prospective emergency services managers the basic information necessary to navigate an emergency services organizational budget, within a public or private sector.

FRS 426 Community Engagement and Involvement
This course is intended to help emergency services managers understand, engage and become involved in the communities that they serve. The course will include discussion about cultural competence and social justice, contemporary issues in the community that impact emergency services organizations and approaches to organizational marketing, community engagement, community involvement, and the value of community service.

FRS 436 Critical Incident Stress Management for Emergency Services
This course introduces the student to the multi-faceted area of interpersonal relations and mental health crisis management for emergency services personnel. Topics under crisis intervention, critical incident stress, post-traumatic stress disorder, conflict resolution, and professional relationships.

FRS 465 Community Risk Reduction for Emergency Services
This course provides a theoretical framework for the understanding of the ethical, sociological, organizational, political, and legal components of community risk reduction and a methodology for the development of a comprehensive community risk reduction plan.

 

Electives 12 credits

You will need to take four electives to complete the fire science curriculum. Please call 877-265-3201 for information on the current list of elective options.